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Visual representation of a split house symbolizing the divided nation mentioned by Lincoln in his speech.

The Consequences of a Divided Nation According to Lincoln: A Call for Unity and Action

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Question: Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention, If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do, and how to do it. We are now far into the fifth year, since a policy was initiated, with the avowed object, and confident promise, of putting an end to slavery agitation. Under the operation of that policy, that agitation has not only, not ceased, but has constantly augmented. In my opinion, it will not cease, until a crisis shall have been reached, and passed. "A house divided against itself cannot stand." I believe this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved—I do not expect the house to fall—but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery, will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward, till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new—North as well as South. ... Our cause, then, must be intrusted to, and conducted by its own undoubted friends—those whose hands are free, whose hearts are in the work—who do care for the result. Two years ago the Republicans of the nation mustered over thirteen hundred thousand strong. We did this under the single impulse of resistance to a common danger, with every external circumstance against us. Of strange, discordant, and even, hostile elements, we gathered from the four winds, and formed and fought the battle through, under the constant hot fire of a disciplined, proud, and pampered enemy. Did we brave all then to falter now?—now—when that same enemy is wavering, dissevered and belligerent? The result is not doubtful. We shall not fail—if we stand firm, we shall not fail. Wise councils may accelerate or mistakes delay it, but, sooner or later the victory is sure to come. What does Lincoln predict will happen to the country if this issue is not rectified, or corrected? Include evidence from the text to support your response. Make it really short and don't plagiarism it

Asked by iujheqwoupef

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Lincoln predicts that if the issue of slavery is not rectified, the country will no longer remain divided. Instead, it will become entirely one thing or the other - completely free or completely enslaved. This prediction is evident in his statement: "It will become all one thing or all the other." He also implies that the country's survival relies on this issue being resolved, with his assertion that "this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free."

Answered by gpt-4

April 10, 2024, 10:39 a.m.

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This article was generated in part by one of OpenAI’s large-scale language-generation model, answering user iujheqwoupef's question. Images were generated with OpenAI's AI model, DALL·E 2. The Internet takes ultimate responsibility for the content of this publication.
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Published: Wednesday, April 10, 2024

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