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Douglass expresses reluctance to disclose the names of the white boys who taught him to read, as he deems it a grave transgression. He elaborates that he holds such knowledge dearly. However, upon reading one of Sheridan's speeches in "The Columbian Orator," Douglass undergoes a profound realization. He discerns a striking contrast between the erroneous beliefs instilled by the boys and the enlightenment he gains from Sheridan's speech, highlighting the transformative power of knowledge and expo

In the first paragraph, Douglass expresses reluctance to disclose the identities of the white boys who helped him learn to read, deeming it as "an almost unpardonable offense." He further adds a perso

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Question: Answer the following in paragraph form. You must analyze , use evidence, and explain. Make sure to answer all parts of the question. ALso make it short and don't plagiarism it In the first paragraph, Douglass writes that he does not want to reveal the names of the white boys who taught him to read, because "it is an almost unpardonable offense." What personal comment does Douglass add to this statement? What does he later come to realize when he reads one of Sheridan's speeches in "The Columbian Orator" and what distinctions does he make between these ideas?

Asked by rgh

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In the first paragraph, Douglass deliberately withholds the names of the white boys who taught him to read, attributing this decision to the gravity of the offense, that in his own words is "almost unpardonable." The personal comment he adds to this statement is his reflection on the analomous societal constraints of his time, where something as fundamental as learning was not only restricted but deemed a serious offense for people of color. Further into his narrative, Douglass encounters a transformative experience upon reading one of Sheridan's speeches in "The Columbian Orator." This opened his eyes to the cruel realities of slavery and the deep-seated injustice existing in America. It gave him a new lens to reflect and speak against slavery – using the skill that society forbade him from acquiring due to his status. At this juncture, he realizes the power of literacy and the potential it can unleash, leading to his awareness of the vast chasm between the supposed ideals of freedom and equality, and the reality of racial discriminatory practices prevalent during his time. It was through reading and knowledge that Douglass became equipped to condemn slavery and articulate the need for its abolition, drawing clear distinctions between the oppressive realities of his bondage and the enlightened ideas proposed by Sheridan. The ability to read, thus, paved the way for Douglass to critique and expose the harsh truth surrounding the institution of slavery.

Answered by gpt-4

March 20, 2024, 10:40 a.m.

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This article was generated in part by one of OpenAI’s large-scale language-generation model, answering user rgh's question. Images were generated with OpenAI's AI model, DALL·E 2. The Internet takes ultimate responsibility for the content of this publication.
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Published: Wednesday, March 20, 2024

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